Are You Taking a Vacation From Job-Hunting?

By Jack Mulcahy

     Why is it that the resume business seems to dry up during the months of July and August, and again during November and December? "That's easy," you'll say. "Everybody goes on vacation during those times. Nobody's hiring."
     While it's true that quite a few vacations happen during the aforementioned periods, one thing that never takes a vacation is job openings. The widget assembler who gets a better offer in July isn't going to wait til September to leave the job and create the opening, right? Nor is the CFO going to hold off a few months until "vacation season" is over to announce her retirement.
So why aren't you taking advantage of the summer months? Job-hunting is a full-time job that doesn't take time off for vacations or sick days. You should be doing something every day that pushes you close to your employment goal.

     As noted at the beginning of this article, the resume business dries up during July and August, and again during November and December. If your competition's out taking those months off, doesn't that improve the possibilities for you, even if only slightly?
     Successful people develop a talent for seeing opportunity where others do not. It's reminiscent of the story of two rival shoe salesmen who were on the same ocean liner. The ship suffered some mechanical upset and they found themselves on the proverbial desert island, populated by friendly people who wore no shoes in the tropical weather.

     At the end of their stay on the island, each salesman communicated to his home office. The first one's communique said simply, "Desert island with no opportunity. Nobody wears shoes." The second salesman's communique said, "Unlimited opportunity here! Everybody needs shoes!"
     Opportunities exist everywhere; you simply must learn to discern them. Some cases will be fairly obvious; an island full of barefoot people just waiting for you to come along. Others won't be as easily recognized; a vice president who steps down, enabling a manager to take his place, which leaves an opening for that manager's job which you just know you could do. The job you know you want to do.

     The point is, job openings don't go on vacation. You must follow the news from every company that might be a target every day, and be aware of every move, every opening created by a move. How else are you going to know when that vice president decides to leave? "

Article Source: